CPSP's Tonya Pavlenko discusses the rationale for its evaluation of Room to Grow, an innovative program for parents and children in New York City.

CPSP's Tonya Pavlenko discusses the rationale for its evaluation of Room to Grow, an innovative program for parents and children in New York City.

CPSP is conducting a randomized controlled trial of an antipoverty program Room to Grow , which provides low-income mothers and children with material and social supports over the first three years of life. CPSP's Tonya Pavlenko recently discussed the powerful motivation behind the program, and how it aims to help new mothers and their babies.

Changes to “Public Charge” Rule May Put 500,000 More U.S. Citizen Children at Risk of Moving into Poverty

 Changes to “Public Charge” Rule May Put 500,000 More U.S. Citizen Children at Risk of Moving into Poverty

The Department of Homeland Security recently proposed a regulation allowing for officials to consider the take-up of non-cash public benefits when deciding whether to admit or deport non-citizens. Immigrant parents, many of whom have citizen children who are entitled to SNAP benefits, are increasingly fearful that any interaction with the government will lead to arrest and deportation. In this brief, we present estimates of the potential impact of this proposal on child poverty.

The House Budget Proposal to Cut SNAP by 40% Would Impact 24 Million People

The House Budget Proposal to Cut SNAP by 40% Would Impact 24 Million People

In an effort to reduce spending and deficits, lawmakers are considering major reforms to entitlement programs like the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP). Cuts to the safety net have drastic consequences for low-income Americans. The CPSP estimated the potential impacts of the House budget proposal to cut SNAP by 40% and found that such a cut would impact 24 million people and cause the poverty rate among SNAP recipients to increase by up to 10.9%. Read the full brief to see all of our results.  

Poverty Tracker Report Finds that for Many Workers, A Job is Not Enough to Keep Them Out of Severe Material Hardship

Poverty Tracker Report Finds that for Many Workers, A Job is Not Enough to Keep Them Out of Severe Material Hardship


The latest report from the Robin Hood Poverty Tracker finds that underemployment is disturbing high among workers in New York City, the majority of whom work full-time. Underemployment, or working fewer hours than desired, is also linked to experiences of severe material hardship such as running out of money between paychecks and utility shutoffs. Steven Lee, managing director of Income Security at Robin Hood notes that “these new results underscore the fact that that low-income New Yorkers don’t need just any job. What they need are good jobs that will provide enough hours, pay a living wage, and help them move out poverty.” Click here for the report summary and here for the full report. Learn more about the Poverty Tracker here.

Robin Hood and the CPSP release Poverty Tracker Report on SNAP Uptake in NYC

Robin Hood and the CPSP release Poverty Tracker Report on SNAP Uptake in NYC

Poverty Tracker data shows that nearly 1 in 4 SNAP-eligible households don’t receive SNAP benefits. A recent report released by Robin Hood and CPSP uses Poverty Tracker data to identify the groups that are less likely to take-up SNAP, despite their eligibility, and the life events associated with SNAP enrollment.  Click here to read a summary of the findings and here to read the full report. Learn more about the Poverty Tracker here.

The Bennet-Brown CTC Proposal Would Cut Child Poverty Nearly in Half

The Bennet-Brown CTC Proposal Would Cut Child Poverty Nearly in Half

Policymakers on both sides of the aisle are currently pushing for reforms to the tax code. As part of this effort, legislators are proposing multiple ideas for strengthening the Child Tax Credit (CTC), a program designed to support families raising children in the United States. A recent proposal introduced by Senators Michael Bennet (D-CO) and Sherrod Brown (D-OH) would expand access to the CTC to those at the bottom of the income distribution and boost the value of the CTC for all credit-eligible families. In this brief, we present results from a simulation of the Bennet-Brown bill. Click here to read the brief.
 

An EITC and CTC “Lookback” Provision Would Move 600,000 Children out of Poverty

An EITC and CTC “Lookback” Provision Would Move 600,000 Children out of  Poverty

Though the Earned Income Tax Credit (EITC) and the Child Tax Credit (CTC) are some of the nation’s most effective antipoverty policies, they track earnings and therefore mirror the instability of recipients’ earnings over the year. A one-year “lookback” is a mechanism that would help reduce this instability. A lookback provision would allow EITC and CTC claimants to look back one year when filing taxes to maximize their credit and smooth earnings instability. In this brief, the CPSP takes a first look at the potential effects of a lookback provision on poverty.

Spotlight Features Christopher Wimer and Jane Waldfogel’s Work on a Universal Child Allowance

Spotlight Features Christopher Wimer and Jane Waldfogel’s Work on a Universal Child Allowance

The Spotlight on Poverty and Opportunity publishes commentaries from academics, policymakers, and advocates on current anti-poverty policy proposals. In June, Spotlight featured  CPSP's Christopher Wimer and Jane Waldfogel’s remarks, along with their colleague Luke Shaefer, on their universal child allowance proposal and its potential impact on child poverty. Click here to read their commentary.

Poverty Tracker Data Used to Look at NYC Food Assistance Programs and Their Impact on Poverty

Poverty Tracker Data Used to Look at NYC Food Assistance Programs and Their Impact on Poverty

The latest data coming from the Robin Hood Poverty Tracker reveals that over one in ten New Yorkers—nearly 1 Million people—often go without enough food to eat.  In our latest report, Food Pantry or Food Stamps: As NYC Food Assistance Programs Grow, How Much Does Poverty Decline?, we use Poverty Tracker data to look at the coping strategies that families facing food insecurity turn to when trying to put food on the table and the potential impact of food assistance programs on poverty in NYC.  Access the report here

CPSP Looks at the Poverty Impacts of the Trump Administration's Proposal to Eliminate the Low Income Home Energy Assistance Program (LIHEAP)

CPSP Looks at the Poverty Impacts of the Trump Administration's Proposal to Eliminate the Low Income Home Energy Assistance Program (LIHEAP)

The CPSP estimated the poverty effects of President Trump’s March 2017 proposal to eliminate the Low Income Home Energy Assistance Program, also known as LIHEAP, that helps low income households pay their utility bills and keep the heat on in the winter. We found that eliminating LIHEAP would move more than 200,000 people into poverty, hurting the rural poor the most.  Read our brief to learn more

CPSP Holds its Second Annual New Frontiers in Poverty Research Conference

CPSP Holds its Second Annual New Frontiers in Poverty Research Conference

The second annual New Frontiers in Poverty Research Conference was held on May 19th, 2016. Keynote speakers, Sheldon Danziger, President of the Russell Sage Foundation, and Christopher S. Jencks, Malcolm Wiener Professor of Social Policy at Harvard's Kennedy School, addressed the future of policy and research on the problem on poverty. Panel discussions focused on innovative approaches to fighting child poverty and the new findings from the Robin Hood Poverty Tracker.

Access video from the conference here

Two Years of Poverty Tracker Data are now Available for Download

Two Years of Poverty Tracker Data are now Available for Download

The CPSP has released two years of Poverty Tracker data collected from 2013 to 2015. The data comes from 9 surveys administered approximately every 3 months following the baseline survey. The baseline, 12m, and 24m surveys contain repeated follow-up questions that are used to calculate hardship and poverty measures. The other surveys focus on specific topics such as health and well being, service utilization, assets and debt, consumption, work and employment, and immigration. The data files contain survey data (in STATA, and CSV formats) along with codebooks and surveys. To protect the confidentiality of respondents, the data has been stripped of any identifying information.

This data is a valuable resource for researchers and policy makers hoping to better understand poverty, hardship, and disadvantage in NYC. It can be accessed here

CPSP Releases the Historical SPM State Fact Sheets

Part of CPSP's poverty measurement research, Poverty in the 50 States: Long Term Trends and the Role of Social Policies presents the first estimates of state-level trends in poverty using a historical version of the Census Bureau and the Bureau of Labor Statistics’ Supplemental Poverty Measure (SPM). The SPM provides a more accurate measure of poverty than the Official Poverty Measure (OPM), which has been in use since the 1960s. CPSP developed individual state fact sheets and compiled all fact sheets into a comprehensive chartbook.

Click here to access the chartbook and state fact sheets and here to learn about the CPSP's historical SPM data set.