Spotlight on Hope and Opportunity: New Yorkers' Perceptions of Economic Mobility and Opportunity

Spotlight on Hope and Opportunity: New Yorkers' Perceptions of Economic Mobility and Opportunity

Earlier this year, Robin Hood added a series of questions about New Yorkers' perceptions of opportunity and fairness to the Poverty Tracker. The results, highlighted in the latest Poverty Tracker report, are striking. Most New Yorkers view the economy as unfair and opportunity as limited, but they are also optimistic about the future, and optimism is highest among those in the most difficult circumstances. These results provide new details and perspectives that will help to inform fight against poverty in New York City. 

The American Family Act would move 4 million children out of poverty, but continuing to tie the credit to earnings nearly halves that impact

The American Family Act would move 4 million children out of poverty, but continuing to tie the credit to earnings nearly halves that impact


The American Family Act's (AFA) proposed reforms to the Child Tax Credit (CTC) present an opportunity to transform the credit into one that works for all children, not just those whose parents earn enough to qualify. We find that the AFA would move 4 million children out of poverty and cut deep poverty among children in half. If the CTC’s credit values were to increase, as they do in the AFA, but with the credit still tied to earnings, this impact would be greatly reduced, and children with the fewest resources would again be left out. Even a less generous hike in the credit value alongside the elimination of the earnings requirement would do more to reduce child poverty than a more generous credit tied to earnings.

2020 tax credit proposals would substantially reduce poverty in the United States

2020 tax credit proposals would substantially reduce poverty in the United States

Reducing poverty and inequality is developing into a central issue in the conversation around the 2020 presidential election. This brief contributes to this conversation by simulating the potential impacts of various policy proposals put forward by 2020 candidates, including estimated costs, anti-poverty effects, and distributional implications of proposed plans. All of the proposals that we simulate here involve new or expanded benefits administered through the tax system. We find that each of the five proposals makes a considerable dent in the poverty rate, though impacts vary across different populations and by the estimated costs and targeting of each proposal.

CPSP's Naomi Zewde finds that "baby bonds" would dramatically reduce racial wealth inequality

CPSP's Naomi Zewde finds that "baby bonds" would dramatically reduce racial wealth inequality

According to the Congressional Budget Office, the distribution of wealth in the United States has grown increasingly unequal over the past half-century, especially along racial lines. Lawmakers and researchers have proposed to address the issue by introducing universal “baby bonds,” paid to each newborn in the United States and preserved until the individual reaches young adulthood. By tying bond values to net worth rather than to income, the proposed scheme intends to better address the extremely persistent racial disparities in net wealth.

A new study by Naomi Zewde, a postdoctoral research scientist at the Center on Poverty and Social Policy, finds that the policy would considerably narrow wealth inequalities by race while simultaneously improving the net-asset position of all young adults and alleviating the increasing concentration of wealth at the top.

Medicaid work requirements could cost families over $1,000 per year, throwing many into poverty 

Medicaid work requirements could cost families over $1,000 per year, throwing many into poverty 

For many low-income households, losing Medicaid coverage means entering poverty. The current administration has called on states to impose work requirements on Medicaid beneficiaries. Last year, three states began requiring documentation of employment for Medicaid eligibility and seven more states have similar proposals pending. The impact of such legislation goes beyond the often critically important loss of healthcare. Loss of Medicaid means an increase in medical-out-of-pocket spending, and those families subject to increased medical costs are vulnerable to falling into poverty. In our latest brief, we simulate the impact of work requirements on medical expenses and poverty. We find that close to 3 million individuals would lose coverage, annual medical expenses could rise by over $1,000 per family losing coverage, and over 130,000 Americans would enter poverty if work requirements were imposed on Medicaid recipients.   

Supplemental Poverty Measure shows that high costs of living erode the impacts of antipoverty policies

Supplemental Poverty Measure shows that high costs of living erode the impacts of antipoverty policies

Costs of living vary tremendously across the US. Yet, historically, our measurement of poverty and our major antipoverty programs have not accounted for this variation. The Supplemental Poverty Measure (SPM) considers a variety of important factors that the official measure does not, including geographic variation in costs of living. This translates into different poverty thresholds for different regions. These geographic variations in the SPM poverty line have a substantial effect on the estimated antipoverty impacts of government programs. In our latest brief, we find that the main reason antipoverty programs seem to make less of a difference in high-cost areas is simply that the costs in those areas are greater. It takes more to make ends meet in high-cost areas, but government benefits do not generally reflect this fact. Ultimately, our analyses show that costs of living are critical to the accurate assessment of state-level poverty rates and the true impact of antipoverty programs.

Poverty Tracker Policy Brief: "Public charge" rule changes could push 115,000 New Yorkers into poverty

Poverty Tracker Policy Brief: "Public charge" rule changes could push 115,000 New Yorkers into poverty

On Sept. 22, 2018, the Department of Homeland Security proposed changes to “public charge” policies that govern applications for legal permanent resident status. The changes would penalize applicants who receive public benefits including parts of Medicaid, the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP), housing assistance, and other public benefits.  The implications for poverty in New York City are stark. Our latest brief demonstrates that these policy changes would push between 65,000 and 115,000 New Yorkers into poverty, including as many as 45,000 children.The report also explores the so called “chilling effect” of the policy, where people drop out of public programs even if they are not directly affected because of misinformation or fear. With those chilling effects, the report estimates the public charge rule changes could negatively affect the income of 400,000 to 700,000 people in New York City.

CPSP releases data table with historical poverty rates measured under the Supplemental Poverty Measure

CPSP releases data table with historical poverty rates measured under the Supplemental Poverty Measure

The CPSP has released a data table featuring the poverty rates from 1967 to 2017 measured under the Supplemental Poverty Measure (SPM). The data table includes the historical SPM poverty rates and SPM poverty rates anchored to the 2012 SPM poverty thresholds with and without taxes and transfers. Results are calculated at the population level, as well as for children, working-age adults, and the elderly. This data table allows researchers to determine poverty rates in a given year without needing to download the historical SPM public-use data files.

Learn more about the historical SPM data files here.

CPSP Releases Report Documenting Rates of Poverty and Material Hardship  Among Lesbian, Gay, and Bisexual Identified New Yorkers 

CPSP Releases Report Documenting Rates of Poverty and Material Hardship  Among Lesbian, Gay, and Bisexual Identified New Yorkers 

New York City has one of the largest Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgender (LGBT) populations in the country. Our latest report uses the Poverty Tracker data to look more closely at how LGB-identified New Yorkers are faring with respect to a number of measures of wellbeing such as health, poverty, and hardship. The report features the first published estimates material hardship among the LBG-identified population in New York City.  Access the report to learn more.

Recent Trends in Food Stamp Usage and Implications for Increased Work Requirements

Recent Trends in Food Stamp Usage and Implications for Increased Work Requirements

With the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP / food stamps) up for renewal, its critics are rallying behind efforts to expand SNAP work requirements to all recipients that they consider to be “work capable.” These critics argue that “work-capable” adults are increasingly taking up SNAP benefits while working less. But are these claims valid? In light of the far-reaching impacts that changes to work requirements would have, our latest research brief provides new empirical evidence regarding benefit take up and work effort of “work-capable” adults. We find that “work-capable” adults do not represent a growing segment of the SNAP caseload and a majority of  “work-capable” adults who receive SNAP are working during the year that they receive benefits. Our results reinforce a body of research indicating that families receive SNAP in times of distress and unemployment, or times for which the safety net was designed. Access our brief to learn more.

Correcting Inequalities in the CTC Created by the Tax Cuts & Jobs Act Would Cut Deep Poverty among Children in California by Nearly 1/3rd

Correcting Inequalities in the CTC Created by the Tax Cuts & Jobs Act Would Cut Deep Poverty among Children in California by Nearly 1/3rd

The Child Tax Credit (CTC) is the closest policy that the U.S. currently has to a universal benefit for families with children, but under the current structure of the credit, many low-income families are left out. The uneven distribution of the CTC provides an opportunity for states to correct the imbalance and ensure that low- and moderate-income families benefit equally from the credit as compared to their higher-income peers. In our latest Poverty & Social Policy Brief, we simulate the costs and benefits of such a correction in the state of California, the state with the highest rate of child poverty. We find that correcting the inequalities in the CTC would yield meaningful reductions in child poverty in California. 

Raising Rents for HUD Housing Program Recipients Would Throw Over Half a Million Americans into Poverty

Raising Rents for HUD Housing Program Recipients Would Throw Over Half a Million Americans into Poverty

The Making Affordable Housing Work Act of 2018, a recent proposal issued by the Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD), outlines a plan to raise rental payments for almost all households that participate in HUD’s housing programs. Our analysis finds that this proposal would deplete the cash resources of participant households by over $750 per year, on average, and move over half a million people into poverty. Read our latest brief to learn more.

CPSP's Tonya Pavlenko discusses the rationale for its evaluation of Room to Grow, an innovative program for parents and children in New York City.

CPSP's Tonya Pavlenko discusses the rationale for its evaluation of Room to Grow, an innovative program for parents and children in New York City.

CPSP is conducting a randomized controlled trial of an antipoverty program Room to Grow , which provides low-income mothers and children with material and social supports over the first three years of life. CPSP's Tonya Pavlenko recently discussed the powerful motivation behind the program, and how it aims to help new mothers and their babies.

Changes to “Public Charge” Rule May Put 500,000 More U.S. Citizen Children at Risk of Moving into Poverty

 Changes to “Public Charge” Rule May Put 500,000 More U.S. Citizen Children at Risk of Moving into Poverty

The Department of Homeland Security recently proposed a regulation allowing for officials to consider the take-up of non-cash public benefits when deciding whether to admit or deport non-citizens. Immigrant parents, many of whom have citizen children who are entitled to SNAP benefits, are increasingly fearful that any interaction with the government will lead to arrest and deportation. In this brief, we present estimates of the potential impact of this proposal on child poverty.

The House Budget Proposal to Cut SNAP by 40% Would Impact 24 Million People

The House Budget Proposal to Cut SNAP by 40% Would Impact 24 Million People

In an effort to reduce spending and deficits, lawmakers are considering major reforms to entitlement programs like the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP). Cuts to the safety net have drastic consequences for low-income Americans. The CPSP estimated the potential impacts of the House budget proposal to cut SNAP by 40% and found that such a cut would impact 24 million people and cause the poverty rate among SNAP recipients to increase by up to 10.9%. Read the full brief to see all of our results.  

Poverty Tracker Report Finds that for Many Workers, A Job is Not Enough to Keep Them Out of Severe Material Hardship

Poverty Tracker Report Finds that for Many Workers, A Job is Not Enough to Keep Them Out of Severe Material Hardship


The latest report from the Robin Hood Poverty Tracker finds that underemployment is disturbing high among workers in New York City, the majority of whom work full-time. Underemployment, or working fewer hours than desired, is also linked to experiences of severe material hardship such as running out of money between paychecks and utility shutoffs. Steven Lee, managing director of Income Security at Robin Hood notes that “these new results underscore the fact that that low-income New Yorkers don’t need just any job. What they need are good jobs that will provide enough hours, pay a living wage, and help them move out poverty.” Click here for the report summary and here for the full report. Learn more about the Poverty Tracker here.

Robin Hood and the CPSP release Poverty Tracker Report on SNAP Uptake in NYC

Robin Hood and the CPSP release Poverty Tracker Report on SNAP Uptake in NYC

Poverty Tracker data shows that nearly 1 in 4 SNAP-eligible households don’t receive SNAP benefits. A recent report released by Robin Hood and CPSP uses Poverty Tracker data to identify the groups that are less likely to take-up SNAP, despite their eligibility, and the life events associated with SNAP enrollment.  Click here to read a summary of the findings and here to read the full report. Learn more about the Poverty Tracker here.

The Bennet-Brown CTC Proposal Would Cut Child Poverty Nearly in Half

The Bennet-Brown CTC Proposal Would Cut Child Poverty Nearly in Half

Policymakers on both sides of the aisle are currently pushing for reforms to the tax code. As part of this effort, legislators are proposing multiple ideas for strengthening the Child Tax Credit (CTC), a program designed to support families raising children in the United States. A recent proposal introduced by Senators Michael Bennet (D-CO) and Sherrod Brown (D-OH) would expand access to the CTC to those at the bottom of the income distribution and boost the value of the CTC for all credit-eligible families. In this brief, we present results from a simulation of the Bennet-Brown bill. Click here to read the brief.
 

An EITC and CTC “Lookback” Provision Would Move 600,000 Children out of Poverty

An EITC and CTC “Lookback” Provision Would Move 600,000 Children out of  Poverty

Though the Earned Income Tax Credit (EITC) and the Child Tax Credit (CTC) are some of the nation’s most effective antipoverty policies, they track earnings and therefore mirror the instability of recipients’ earnings over the year. A one-year “lookback” is a mechanism that would help reduce this instability. A lookback provision would allow EITC and CTC claimants to look back one year when filing taxes to maximize their credit and smooth earnings instability. In this brief, the CPSP takes a first look at the potential effects of a lookback provision on poverty.