Caregiving is a challenge faced by New Yorkers across all walks of life

 
Categories marked with asterisks (*** - .001, ** - .01, *-.05) indicate a statistically significant difference between caregivers and non-caregivers.

Categories marked with asterisks (*** - .001, ** - .01, *-.05) indicate a statistically significant difference between caregivers and non-caregivers.

About one in six New York City adults reported taking care of an ill or disabled relative; this rate held across demographic groups. Using Poverty Tracker data, we find that many New York City caregivers experience financial, emotional, and physical difficulties related to caregiving. Caregivers with health issues or lower incomes were more likely to face difficulties. Four in ten caregivers have used services, such as support groups or respite care, to help with caring for family members.

While we find that caregiving in New York City is common and associated with compromised well-being, not all groups access services equally. It is important that all family caregivers can access services that support them as they take care of others.

The Poverty Tracker is a joint project of Robin Hood and Columbia University in the study of disadvantage in New York City.